Garmin Fishfinder

Rigging the Garmin Striker 4 Fishfinder

After losing my fishfinder last year in Donegal it was time to get the new one fitted. After Santa fooked up at Xmas and brought me a PS4 instead of a fishfinder, the missus got it right this time round and got me a Garmin Striker 4 for the birthday. This one is actually pretty cool as it features Chirp technology and it has a built in GPS. This all comes is a small neat package that’s ideal for the kayak.

Garmin Striker 4 Fishfinder

Garmin Striker 4 Fishfinder

First up was to find somewhere inside the hull of the kayak to fit the transducer. Now it’s amazing how few flat surfaces are inside the Wilderness Ride 135 which makes fitting anything tricky. I spotted a video on You Tube where a chap put the transducer inside a sealed plastic container and filled it with water, thus eliminating any air bubbles that may form under it and interfere with readings. The space behind the seat under the rear hatch looked ideal but the V shape of the hull meant cutting my container with the angle grinder.

Garmin transducer fitting

The space behind the seat to take the transducer

Using a rough paper template I marked the plastic food container and cut away the base to match the shape of the hull. Two small pilot holes at one end allowed me to screw the transducer into the wall of the container and through the foam block under my seat. Another hole allowed the cable to pass through on it’s way to the fishfinder.

Once the cutting was done I added two thick rubber washers to act as spacers – (the screws were removed once the washers were stuck). I need this bit of space to allow me put the lid on easily.

Transducer container with spacers

Transducer container with spacers

I marked out the outline of the box and put thick two beads of sealer around the markings. Using the transducer screw holes, I fitted the box in place and sealed up the base with copious amounts of sealer. The idea is that I then fill this box with water, put the lid on and we’re in business – obviously with the transducer in place.

Container with transducer inside.

Container with transducer inside.

Garmin transducer box fitted in hull of kayak

Garmin transducer box fitted in hull of kayak

The transducer cable was then fed through to hull up towards where the fishfinder and battery were going to live. This time a big hole was drilled between the Garmin and the Scotty Rod holder and the cables fed up through it.

Hole for power and transducer cables

Hole for power and transducer cables

The two cables were then pushed in through a rubber bung that I found in my tool box. Plenty of sealer was then applied sealer around the hole and the bung pushed into place to seal the hole.

Fishfinder cables fed through grommet

Fishfinder cables fed through grommet

Cables sealed into the hull

Cables sealed into the hull

Plenty of sealer in between the cables should ensure a watertight seal.

Battery for the Garmin in sealed box.

Battery for the Garmin in sealed box.

Next up was the battery to power the fishfinder. Another watertight plastic food storage container was pressed into action. The battery fitted in very snugly with enough room for the fuse. A hole drilled in the lid fitted with a watertight grommet enables the cable to pass through and up to the Garmin. The whole box then wedges snugly inside the hull of the kayak with easy access through the front hatch.

Fishfinder battery inside the hull

Fishfinder battery inside the hull

The beauty of this is the battery is kept dry and can be easily removed for charging. So that’s the kayak ready for fishing again. It’s been a pain the last few months without the fishfinder as you’ve no idea what depth you’re in or what kind of ground you’re trying to fish. All we need now is some decent weather and we’ll be back out on the ocean waves chasing fish.

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